Hey Jeff Gorton, Don't Malhotra Lias Andersson

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Dave Rogers

Editor-in-Chief at Cleared for Contact
Writer, photographer and a lifelong New York Rangers hockey fan.
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“With the seventh overall selection in this year’s NHL Entry Draft, the New York Rangers are proud to select…”

Over the past 20 years, the Rangers have picked in the top ten of the NHL Entry Draft only six times. Their highest selection was fourth overall, followed by a sixth, two chances at seventh and two at tenth. Five of those players are a who’s who of “who?” if you aren’t a Rangers’ fan and a source of frustration if you are.

1998 – Manny Malhotra (C) – 7th Overall
1999 – Pavel Brendl (LW) – 4th Overall
2002 – Dan Blackburn (G) – 10th Overall
2004 – Al Montoya (G) – 6th Overall
2010 – Dylan McIlrath (D) – 10th Overall

The sixth pick is Swedish center Lias Andersson who was the Rangers’ choice at the seventh spot in the 2017 draft, a selection they secured as part of the compensation received from the Arizona Coyotes in exchange for center Derek Stepan.

Many articles have been written about why each of the previous five top ten first round drafted options has failed to deliver the value expected from where they were selected. From injury to overreach, even to pure statistical probability, there are very clear reasons that the Rangers have failed to find top level talent in what is the juiciest portion of the draft.

One of these players is not like the others, though. Manny Malhotra played in 991 regular season games in the NHL. If it was guaranteed to you that Lias Anderson would match that number, you would be a fool not to jump at the deal. Yet Malhotra is largely seen as a bust, and there is a very clear reason why that is the case.

Malhotra was never projected to be a dynamic scorer but did have 50 point expectations along with strong two-way play and as an ace in the defensive zone. That sounds an awful lot like what we have been hearing about Lias Andersson.

Over the last 20 years, only 56 other forwards have skated in as many games as Malhotra. Yet he is second to last in total regular season points (295) and P/GP (0.30) ahead of only noted tough guy Chris Neil in both categories. Malhotra is also in a three-way tie along with Shane Doan and Jason Arnott for the 14th best draft position in that group. His 295 career regular season points are less than half of the next lowest total of those taken above him, that of David Legwand (618), who is also considered a bust. Of the next 15 players selected with equal or later picks, Radek Dvorak, taken 10th overall with 563 points is next closest to Malhotra’s totals.

Hockey’s Future at the time called the selection of Malhotra a steal for the Rangers.

http://www.hockeysfuture.com/articles/351/manny_malhotra_rangers_catch_a_steal

As the draft grew closer the Rangers had their sights set on a center, a big center with allot [SIC] of upside. Unfortunately, their top choices David Legwand and Manny Malhotra were ranked second and sixth respectively. Most experts actually expected them to go second and third. The Rangers chance to draft a big time center was slim. But something happened on that hot June day, somehow to the Rangers surprise Malhotra fell into their laps.

This was not a case where management hubris had the Rangers’ reaching for a pick who the scouts and pundits had much lower in their rankings. They got the player they wanted at or ahead of the position he was supposed to go in. Malhotra was not hampered by injuries over the majority of his career, even as he did suffer an eye injury prior to his final few NHL seasons that reduced his role on his team even further. That role was already limited over the course of his career, where he never managed to be much more than a third or fourth line center.

That was certainly not the hope of the New York Rangers when calling his name in the seventh spot. They clearly were banking on him becoming one of their top centers of the future. Unfortunately, that future came much too early. In the 1998/99 season, the team was facing a stark reality that they had an enormous void at center. To start the year, an aging Wayne Gretzky was in his final NHL season and the Rangers had yet to re-acquire Petr Nedved from the Pittsburgh Penguins.

That left Malhotra in his draft year along with second-year pivot Marc Savard, who had played in 28 games and put up six points the previous season, competing for the second line center position. Both young players would fail and the Rangers team would find themselves last in the league, forcing then general manager Neil Smith to trade for Nedved in late November. That pushed Malhotra to a bottom six spot, a role he never managed to escape over his NHL career. He was in and out of the lineup the following season, one in which he would have been much better served to get regular minutes at the AHL level.

The 2017/18 Rangers do not have nearly the same void at center. While they do not possess a true number one, they have some hopes to fill that spot between Mika Zibanejad and Kevin Hayes. If Andersson makes the team in the same year as his draft, he will not face the lofty expectations that Malhotra did. However, he will find himself in a different role than what he’s been used to. Barring injury to Zibanejad or Hayes, rather than being depended on as a top center, he will be filling out either the third or the fourth line. Rangers coach Alain Vigneault is known for taking his time with young players until he can trust them. That may mean a couple of seasons where Andersson is placed in a position where he is not counted on for offense, something that could stifle the Swedish forward’s production. One saving grace there is the Rangers’ depth on the wing. Unless he is pushed back to the fourth line, he’ll likely pivot two talented wingers.

Still, there is a risk here. Rushing an 18-year-old player to the NHL, not because they are necessarily ready, but because you have a hole to fill can backfire. Whether a coach expects too much or protects too often, the player is not brought along through the normal development path. For all but the top young players, that path is to prove themselves at the AHL level or in a top European league, take a spot through camp and then hold onto it as others nip at their heels. The Rangers lack the center depth to provide that kind of competition, though. The players likely pushing Andersson would be UFA reclamation project David Desharnais and 23-year-old former second round selection Cristoval “Boo” Nieves. Neither is a lock for the team at this point, although Desharnais’ experience likely gives him an inside track. There is also the option of switching J.T. Miller back over to center, however, Miller has finally started to produce more consistently so that change may be ill advised.

Perhaps it all works out in the end and Andersson becomes what Malhotra should have been, a quality two-way second line center with some offensive upside. Maybe that happens because Rangers’ management heeds the cautionary tale Malhotra provides and ease Andersson along as he likely should be. Or he does seize the opening, the Rangers’ top two centers of the moment remain healthy and Andersson shows he belongs. What can not happen is for the Rangers’ to repeat the same history we have seen for the last 20 years among their top ten draft picks, another young player never fulfilling his potential, for whatever reason.

Discussion
  1. I think some people hoped Manny would be a big NHL scorer based on being a high draft pick but he was never a PPG scorer in juniors or the AHL so it was unlikely he would be a big scorer in the NHL.





    Quote Originally Posted by ClearedForContact
    View Post

    “With the seventh overall selection in this year’s NHL Entry Draft, the New York Rangers are proud to select…”

    Over the past 20 years, the Rangers have picked in the top ten of the NHL Entry Draft only six times. Their highest selection was fourth overall, followed by a sixth, two chances at seventh and two at tenth. Five of those players tapped are a who’s who of “who?” if you aren’t a Rangers’ fan and a source of frustration if you are.

    1998 - Manny Malhotra (C) - 7th Overall
    1999 - Pavel Brendl (LW) - 4th Overall
    2002 - Dan Blackburn (G) - 10th Overall
    2004 - Al Montoya (G) - 6th Overall
    2010 - Dylan McIlrath (D) - 10th Overall

    The sixth pick is Swedish center Lias Andersson who was the Rangers’ choice at the seventh spot in the 2017 draft, a selection they secured as part of the compensation received from the Arizona Coyotes in exchange for center Derek Stepan.

    Click here to view the article.



    Not to be that guy, but you've also got Jamie Lundmark in 99. Two top 10 picks there.
    As good as some kids are, you just never know. There's a long list of things that can impede a player's developmental path. Prep school, junior, college, and pro scouts look so deep into players that they their heads are in their assholes. Everything and anything, from talking to their youth coaches to scanning every post made on every social media account.





    Quote Originally Posted by torontonyr
    View Post

    Dan Blackburn could've been one of the NHL's top goalies, shame about his injury.



    I remember watching a game with him in goal, was pre-webstreams so a rare chance for me to watch the Rangers. So I watched late night despite high fever.
    Against the Pens, Blackburn was amazing, but we still lost. 0-1 ...in OT even I think, not sure about that part though. I think Hedberg was in Goal for the Pens? Too long ago.





    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey37
    View Post

    By who? Everyone but the people that actually matter ? My point is that he played that 3rd-4th line role for almost 20 NHL seasons, so how does his first 1-2 years make a difference ? They don't. Saaaame bullshit from idiot fans about Kreider. He got thrown into the fire, scored a few goals in the playoffs, and everyone thought he was a superstar, except Torts. Then Torts was the asshole for not wanting him up here because he felt like he needed more work in the A, until AV cut him from the opening night roster a few short months later. He needed time, a few goals means shit. He got his chance and he's a better player than he was back then. Still a lug head, but better. Fans really have no idea what goes into developing a player properly.



    ? I was kinda saying Muckler was right? Being a mature kid and ready to step in, doesn't translate into being a top player. Sorry I didn't explain that.. I figured that was a given due to the premise of the thread. Saying a player is NHL ready, doesn't mean they are a top six player.

    I thought Neil Smith wanted to justify the pick and wanted to prop him up as more than he was by hoping to slot him in a big role right off the bat. Muckler pretty much nailed it and used I think Mike York over him, which I think caused a big rift between Smith and Muckler.





    Quote Originally Posted by torontonyr
    View Post

    Dan Blackburn could've been one of the NHL's top goalies, shame about his injury.



    Yeah, and it was so early in his career. I still wouldn't go after a goalie that early though, no matter how highly touted he is. What makes it harder to swallow is that the Rangers could have bought any established goalie they wanted, why waste an early pick? You give Holik 8 zillion, but you won't go after a goalie? Odd. Method to the madness, I guess.





    Quote Originally Posted by The Dude
    View Post

    Unless you ask Muckler. He had him pegged as a 3rd line center. Such comments sent Ranger message boards into frenzies.

    Malhotra was deemed as a mature, ready to step in player. He was. But management wanted him used in a way the coach felt wasn't for him. I don't recall Malhotra playing much on the 2nd line. Gotta look back at the roster to remember who played over him.



    By who? Everyone but the people that actually matter ? My point is that he played that 3rd-4th line role for almost 20 NHL seasons, so how does his first 1-2 years make a difference ? They don't. Saaaame bullshit from idiot fans about Kreider. He got thrown into the fire, scored a few goals in the playoffs, and everyone thought he was a superstar, except Torts. Then Torts was the asshole for not wanting him up here because he felt like he needed more work in the A, until AV cut him from the opening night roster a few short months later. He needed time, a few goals means shit. He got his chance and he's a better player than he was back then. Still a lug head, but better. Fans really have no idea what goes into developing a player properly.





    Quote Originally Posted by AmericanJesus
    View Post

    It's one of those things that is impossible to know, but then, if everything in sports was just a fact or a number, there would be no reason to discuss any of it. My recollection was that he was rushed to the NHL because of need. Then he was bounced between the Rangers, AHL and the stands. There were issues where the coach, I think it was Muckler at the time, was calling him out in the press.

    Looking at his stats, he played 73 games as an 18 year old, then 39 total games the following season between the NHL and AHL. He sat in the stands for half a season. Would you recommend that for a 19 year old second year player?



    If he wasn't up and down, does he turn into a top 6 player for 18 years? Doubt it.





    Quote Originally Posted by AmericanJesus
    View Post

    It's one of those things that is impossible to know, but then, if everything in sports was just a fact or a number, there would be no reason to discuss any of it. My recollection was that he was rushed to the NHL because of need. Then he was bounced between the Rangers, AHL and the stands. There were issues where the coach, I think it was Muckler at the time, was calling him out in the press.

    Looking at his stats, he played 73 games as an 18 year old, then 39 total games the following season between the NHL and AHL. He sat in the stands for half a season. Would you recommend that for a 19 year old second year player?



    Didn't he have a major knee injury or something? I don't think he sat for bad play or coaching decisions.





    Quote Originally Posted by AmericanJesus
    View Post

    It's one of those things that is impossible to know, but then, if everything in sports was just a fact or a number, there would be no reason to discuss any of it. My recollection was that he was rushed to the NHL because of need. Then he was bounced between the Rangers, AHL and the stands. There were issues where the coach, I think it was Muckler at the time, was calling him out in the press.

    Looking at his stats, he played 73 games as an 18 year old, then 39 total games the following season between the NHL and AHL. He sat in the stands for half a season. Would you recommend that for a 19 year old second year player?



    Didn't he have a major knee injury or something? I don't think he sat for bad play or coaching decisions.





    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey37
    View Post

    Maholtra played almost 20 years in the NHL. The Rangers didn't hurt him, he just never lived up to expectations as far as where he was drafted.



    Unless you ask Muckler. He had him pegged as a 3rd line center. Such comments sent Ranger message boards into frenzies.

    Malhotra was deemed as a mature, ready to step in player. He was. But management wanted him used in a way the coach felt wasn't for him. I don't recall Malhotra playing much on the 2nd line. Gotta look back at the roster to remember who played over him.
    I think the point of this whole discussion is to point out the biggest crime is failing to learn from past mistakes.. AV has historically given kids about 2 inches of rope so they can't hang themselves (not saying its a bad methodology)... AJ had the numbers on Manny M- they speak volumes. Let's either let him PLAY and develop (warts and all) on the NHL roster, or in the AHL.. Its hard to get better eating popcorn in the press-box or on a train between Hartford and Penn Station.





    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey37
    View Post

    Maholtra played almost 20 years in the NHL. The Rangers didn't hurt him, he just never lived up to expectations as far as where he was drafted.



    It's one of those things that is impossible to know, but then, if everything in sports was just a fact or a number, there would be no reason to discuss any of it. My recollection was that he was rushed to the NHL because of need. Then he was bounced between the Rangers, AHL and the stands. There were issues where the coach, I think it was Muckler at the time, was calling him out in the press.

    Looking at his stats, he played 73 games as an 18 year old, then 39 total games the following season between the NHL and AHL. He sat in the stands for half a season. Would you recommend that for a 19 year old second year player?





    Quote Originally Posted by AmericanJesus
    View Post

    I'm less concerned about the selection and more concerned with whether Andersson will be allotted the proper development path for his ability and maturity as a player.

    Malhotra wasn't a bad selection, he was rushed to the NHL because the Rangers were old, never properly filled the cupboards and found a huge hole at center. He should have gone back to juniors if he wasn't AHL eligible (forget the rules there 20 years ago).

    Instead he was put behind Gretzky as a number two and slipped from there, never to achieve his potential.

    Rangers aren't in the same position, but the hole is still there and Andersson likely will be looked at as an option to fill it. They need to be careful not to burn a big asset here.



    Maholtra played almost 20 years in the NHL. The Rangers didn't hurt him, he just never lived up to expectations as far as where he was drafted.

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